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Will spring drought put a damper on our fall colors this year?

In this Daily Herald article, Shawn Kingzette from Davey's Crystal Lake, Illinois, office talks about how drought may affect fall leaf color this year. 

Posted: September 27, 2021 

Autumn begins today with shorter, cooler days and the eventual arrival of bands of color overhead, as leaves turn and drop. autumn trees line a street

When does the show start?

"It's a year-to-year thing," said Julie Janoski, plant clinic manager at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle. "Being so dry this year is definitely impactful."

The peak for fall colors in the suburbs usually arrives around Oct. 20, but the exact timing and intensity depends on the weather going forward, location and other factors.

Black walnuts and eastern cottonwoods already have begun to drop leaves. Honey locusts are turning yellow. Freeman's and Autumn Blaze maples are showing early colors this year.

"I think they're responding to the drought," rather than disease or insects, said Shawn Kingzette, district manager for The Davey Tree Expert Co.

To continue reading Shawn's advice, click here

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