Taking action against insect emerald ash borer

In this article from Golden Transcript, Davey's Derek Fox talks about EAB and what can be done to prevent the insect from damaging Ash trees.  

By Amy Woodward

Published: June 23, 2014

The city has finished their treatments of ash trees for the season in preparation of a possible spread of the emerald ash borer, an invasive insect native to Asia.

Since May 1 the city treated 250 public ash trees including another 75 which were tended by maintenance at the Colorado School of Mines campus.
Some descriptionGolden has approximately 15,000 ash trees, 10 percent of them public, according to Dave High, city forester with the city of Golden.

Since its appearance in Boulder in September 2013, the emerald ash borer has caught the attention of officials, scientists and arborists alike who are helping to spread the word about the potential danger the emerald ash borer has on Ash trees.

“Once an exotic pest comes in and it doesn’t have the natural controls like it does in its native environment, they run kind of wild, there’s not much that slows them down or stops them,” said Derek Fox, district manager and certified arborist for the Davey Tree Expert Company.

Already, the EAB has killed millions of Ash trees in the U.S., Fox said.

The Colorado Department of Agriculture estimates that ash found in the urban forest accounts for 15 percent of the tree canopy.

“The larva of the insect is what does the most damage,” Fox explained. “When the larva feed they feed just under the bark of the tree,” he said. “Basically, what that does is it girdles the tree just under the bark and essentially shuts down the tree’s vascular system.”

Once the larva has grown to adult beetles they emerge in the spring leaving behind a “D” shaped exit hole.

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