Thousand Cankers Disease prompts wood quarantine in Pa.

In this segment and article from WHYY, Davey's Chris Miller talks about Thousand Cankers Disease and what it is doing to trees in the area. 

By Kimberly Haas 

Posted: August 14, 2014 

Caused by a fungus that's transported by the walnut twig beetle, the disease attacks the innermost layer of a tree's bark, called the phloem.

Some description

The forests of Pennsylvania's northern tier produce the kinds of wood that are favorites for beautiful furniture and front doors, such as cherry, oak and walnut.

Unfortunately, pests love them too. Pennsylvania's horticultural history seems to include a steady stream of insects and fungi that threaten this major industry (recall the chestnut blight and Dutch elm disease).

Now, even as Pennsylvania grapples with the latest scourge of the Emerald ash borer, a new pest has arrived on our doorstep. 

It bears the ominous name of Thousand Cankers Disease. Caused by a fungus that's transported by the walnut twig beetle, it attacks the innermost layer of a tree's bark, called the phloem.

"When the beetle bores into the tree, into the phloem, that canker will start under the bark," said arborist Chris Miller. "The phloem is what's bringing all the nutrients of the tree, from the top down. It basically shuts down the vascular system of the tree."

To listen to the rest of the story, click here.  

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